GP Blog

In this blog, you will find information and medical advice from Dr James Booth and Dr Liz Towers (MECCG elected GP Board members) on a variety of health and wellbeing topics.

Dr James BoothDr Booth is a GP and partner at Melbourne House Surgery in Chelmsford. His interest is children's mental health and is the CCGs named GP for safeguarding adults and children.

 

Elizabeth Towers for webDr Towers has been a GP at Whitley House Surgery in Chelmsford for 30 years having spent three years as a junior doctor in the Chelmsford area. She is interested in cancer and end of life care and became a Macmillan GP in 2010.

How to manage Asthma as the weather heats up

Dr Booth, advises how best to manage this common condition as the weather heats up and pollen levels rise.

Around 5.4 million people in the UK suffer from asthma1 – that’s one in every 11 people and one in five households. For a quarter of a million people with severe asthma, even climbing the stairs can feel like a marathon, never mind going outside their home.

It’s really important for those that have a long term condition such as asthma to really understand it. By taking responsibility for your own health and following medical advice you can lead a more fulfilling life. Knowing the triggers and managing your condition can also mean fewer admissions to hospital so you can really enjoy time with friends and family without having to worry.

Research shows there are two key things, as an asthma sufferer, you can do to reduce the effect of asthma triggers:

Firstly, manage your asthma as much as possible. This means taking preventer medication as prescribed. Most of the time you won’t even know it’s working, but it is and it helps reduce your body’s reaction to triggers. Keeping a note of the circumstances of when you have an attack means you can work with your GP or asthma nurse to put together an action plan. Regular reviews can make sure you’re taking exactly the right medication.

Secondly, understand your triggers. When you know your triggers you can work with your GP or asthma nurse on the best way to stop them causing symptoms. Obvious triggers start within minutes of coming into contact with your trigger. Other triggers aren’t as easy to pinpoint and can sometimes be a delayed reaction. If you can’t work out why you’re having an attack keep a diary of everywhere you go and what you were doing. This will help you spot patterns so the right treatment can be agreed.

Take time to explain your condition to loved ones. Tell them about your condition, the medications you have and what they can do to help. Then should you suffer an attack they will know exactly what to do. If you know someone with asthma take time to understand the symptoms. Ask them about their triggers and medication and whether there’s anything you can do to help.

If you have any concerns about your condition it’s important to talk to your GP or asthma nurse so they can review your health care plan.

For more information you can visit NHS Choices or Asthma UK.